Category Archives: Camps

2016 Wild Food Summit Registration Deadline Extended

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2016

The 10th Wild Food Summit (WFS) runs Thursday, June 16th thru Sunday the 19th at the White Earth Reservation Little Elbow Lake DSC04771Tribal Campground. This year, we are running it as an ‘Open Space event.’ with topics led by those attending.

Since the Wild Food Summit is a different format for this year, all wild food identification and preparationregistrations for WFS will be brought through a committee and accepted based on each applicant’s input as to their contributions and knowledge they would like to learn and share with their local communities.

The Registration Deadline has been extended to Thursday, March 10, 2016.  All Applicants will be notified via email on their registration proposals after that date. Approved proposals will be given a link to complete registration payment.

Registration fee: $100.00 Per Adult (Youth 17 & Younger-Free) Free registration to White Earth area residents.

For more info call Tammy at 218-935-0417 Ext 213

To submit you application click on the link below. You will be taken to another site and will need to create a login account. Then you will be able to answer the required questions and submit your application.
submit

2016 Wild Food Summit Registration

The 10th Wild Food Summit (WFS) runs Thursday, June 16th thru Sunday the 19th at the White Earth Reservation Little Elbow  Lake DSC04771Tribal Campground. This year, we are running it as an ‘Open Space event.’ with topics led by those attending.

Since the Wild Food Summit is a different format for this year, all wild food identification and preparationregistrations for WFS will be brought through a committee and accepted based on each applicant’s input as to their contributions and knowledge they would like to learn and share with their local communities.

The Registration Deadline is Friday, February 19th.  All Applicants will be notified via email on their registration proposals by Tuesday, February 23rd.  At that time, approved proposals will be given a link to complete registration payment.

Registration fee: $100.00 Per Adult (Youth 17 & Younger-Free) Free registration to White Earth area residents.

For more info call Tammy at 218-935-0417 Ext 213

To submit you application click on the link below. You will be taken to another site and will need to create a login account. Then you will be able to answer the required questions and submit your application.
submit

2010 Nature of Technology Camps are a success!

By Kaitlyn Murray, Waubun

Twenty-nine students in grades six through eight participated in the Nature of Technology Camps held July 12-15 at Waubun High School and July 19-22 at Mahnomen High School. Students were given intensive training in Nature Photography and an introduction to GPS, throughout the camp and especially on the day trip to the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge.

“I liked being able to be in the bird blinds and take pictures (while at the Tamarac),” said Hattie Dorman.

Students also learned how to use a telescope as a camera called digi-scoping,  how to use an online editing and enhancing program  called Picasa as well as basic how to create a photography show. The student’s work was celebrated by staff and family in a closing photography show.

“I learned how to take lots of cool pictures and how to take them at different angels.” Said 8th grader Laura Lindsay.

The Waubun and Mahnomen Nature of Technology camps were made possible by a grant from the Minnesota State Community and Technical College awarded to the Extension office of the White Earth Tribal and Community College in partnership with the University of Minnesota, 4-H. To see some of the  Waubun student’s work go to www.waubun.k12.mn.us.

Waubun Camp (Left to right) Front row: Steve Maanum, Hannah Lanoue, Murphy Cammisuli, Ethan Benson, Reba Lego, Hattie Dorman, Megan Fairbanks, Heyley Lehmann, Josie Bellanger, Matt Fairbanks and Rebecca Dallinger 2nd Row: Steve Dahlberg, Laura Lindsay, Zach Beaupre, Alexis Belland, Kaitlyn Murray, Lara Hanks, Miya Rojas, Tanner Bellanger, Hunter Boudreau Photo by Pam Lehmann
Mahnomen camp (Left to right ) Front row: Steve Dahlberg, Extension WETCC Director, Katahna Bosley, Whitney Granger, Alyssa Olson, Rebecca Dallinger (Camp Coordinator &Photographer), and Photographer Steve Maanum 2nd row, Joe Courneya (U of MN 4-H), Skye Arriola, Angela Amberg, Keshawn Goodwin, Ashley Johnson, Michael Larson, Justine Haugo, Debbie Dixon and Javonnis Knox Photo by Pam Lehmann

Crafting Bone Tools

The underlying philosophy of WETCC Extension Service is to reconnect people with nature. In an effort to understand and appreciate the gifts of Mother Earth, we explore the traditions of our ancestors. One of the traditions that seems to be very clear and universal to all Indigenous Peoples is to use what you have and let nothing go to waste.

With that in mind, it is hunting season in this part of the world. The meat and bones from a variety of animals give us much needed protein. So many times the bones are discarded after the soup is gone. With a little bit of creativity and a couple of saws and files, beautiful ornaments and functional tools can be made. A few of the items made at Extensions recent workshop are, knives, fish hooks, needles, tooth picks, lamp base, awls, and pendants.

Simple steps to creating bone tools.

Step one: Gather bones. Use bones from a hunt, local meat processor or from a finished meal.

Step two: Remove skin, hooves and as much meat and tendons as possible. Be sure to cut the bones so that the marrow can be removed from the bone (remove at least one joint)

Step three: Boil the bones until all of the marrow can be removed from the bone. This may take several hours. Do not put the bones in the oven as the dry heat will make the bones brittle.

Step four: Let the bones air dry.

Step five: Draw a pattern on the air dried bone. Cut the bone with a saw to shape the tool. Use files to finish shaping the tool.

Step six: Polish finished tool with sand paper and steel wool. Option- soak the tool in peroixide to whiten.

 

 

 

 

 

Indigenous Gardener Mentor

FREE TRAINING!!!  The Indigenous Gardener Mentor curriculum offers free training in a multitude of skills such as: gardening, various forms of food processing, hide tanning , crafting bone tools, building root cellars, wild food identification and preparation, tracking, personal care products, and whatever else we can think of! 
 
WHAT WE ASK FOR IN RETURN: Pass the training on. The method in which that happens is up to you. Examples are: training family and friends, holding community workshops, building employable skills.

WHO’S ELIGIBLE? Anyone willing to learn! Adult Tribal and Non-Tribal Community Members are welcome. ( Special trainings can be held for those under 18 years of age. Contact us for more information extension@wetcc.org)

UPCOMING TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES November 2009:  Root Cellar Construction, Crafting Bone Tools, Make Vinegar From Wild Fruits and Herbs

TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES 2010:  Stone Carving, Outdoor Clay Oven Construction, Clay Oven Baking, Spoon Carving- wood and horn, Gardening Made Simple, Anishinaabe Nutrition and much more!

CONTACT INFORMATION:  extension@wetcc.org

IMG_0458Bone Toolswild food identification and preparation